Voices - Visitors' Experience

Visitors' Experience

Friday, October 6, 2017 - 4:19pm

A Recap of Gallery Talk Series: Confederate Flag Heritage vs. Hate

“I know what that flag means,” said a visitor in the crowd at the second of our gallery talk series, The Confederate Flag: Heritage vs. Hate that occurred Saturday, September 30th, 2017.

To be honest, I wasn’t sure what to expect with leading this gallery talk. Though I don’t refer to myself as a scholar of the Confederate flag, I have dedicated a majority of my master’s studies to the subject. In graduate school I took on the project of discussing the Confederate flag in public memory, turning it into my capstone thesis. Having given presentations over the debate about the Confederate flag before, I was confident in my knowledge of the subject. However, with the debate about Confederate imagery heating up in the media, I was unsure what type of reaction I would receive from this discussion.

Not only was the crowd on Saturday receptive to what I was saying, they were engaging and vocal on their experiences with the Confederate flag. This was crucial for me because above all else, I wanted to spark a meaningful dialogue with visitors about the flag. What I hoped to gain from this gallery talk was to help people understand why there is a debate about the Confederate flag and the many interpretations associated with this one symbol. What I walked away with was encouragement that regardless how tough the conversation may be, people are ready to have these discussions about current issues we are facing in America today.

Although it may be uncomfortable, I urge you to push yourself to have a dialogue with others about issues that you feel need to be discussed.

    Katie Bramell Researcher National Underground Railroad Freedom Center
Friday, September 15, 2017 - 9:43am

Special Events Directions for September 15 - September 16, 2017

 

 

With so much going on this weekend with Oktoberfest Zinzinnati and the Hudepohl 14K Brewery Run, we want to remind you that we are still open during our regular business hours of 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Friday and Saturday. See below for directions to the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center with Oktoberfest Road Closures and if you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at (513) 333-7500. Please note: street closures/routes are subject to change.

 

Friday, September 15, 2017

Groups and General Admission

·        Southbound I-75 (from Dayton, Sharonville)

o   Take I-75 south toward downtown Cincinnati. Take the right side exit, Exit 1F, Freeman Avenue. Continue straight on to Freeman Ave, bearing left on Mehring Way after approximately 0.5 miles. Continue on to Mehring Way (east bound).

§  Cars:  Continue on to Mehring way for approximately 2 miles, and turn left in to the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. Parking in the “green” section allows for easiest access to the Freedom Center.

§  Buses:  After approximately 1.2 miles turn left on to Elm St. Turn right at the first traffic light on to Freedom Way Turn right on to Rosa Parks Street and take the second exit on the traffic circle for Walnut Street. Turn left on to Freedom Way and park directly in front of the building. Please pull forward as far as possible so we can accommodate as many buses as we are able.

 

·        Southbound I-71 (from Columbus, Kenwood, Montgomery)

o   Take I-71 south toward downtown Cincinnati. Once downtown, follow the signs for I-75 N through the Lytle tunnel. As you exit the tunnel, get into the second lane from the left for the I-75 north exit. Once on I-75 north, take the first exit on the right, Exit 1G, Liberty St./Ezzard Charles Drive. At end of the exit merge left to turn left at the traffic light, in to the left hand lane on Ezzard Charles Drive. Once on Ezzard Charles Drive turn left at the traffic light on to Western Avenue. Continue in the center lane to turn left at the traffic light. Immediately after the left hand turn you will use the right hand lane to turn on to Freeman Avenue. Continue straight on to Freeman Ave, bearing left on Mehring Way after approximately 0.5 miles. Continue on to Mehring Way (east bound).

§  Cars:  Continue on to Mehring way for approximately 2 miles, and turn left in to the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. Parking in the “green” section allows for easiest access to the Freedom Center.

§  Buses:  After approximately 1.2 miles turn left on to Elm St. Turn right at the first traffic light on to Freedom Way Turn right on to Rosa Parks Street and take the second exit on the traffic circle for Walnut Street. Turn left on to Freedom Way and park directly in front of the building. Please pull forward as far as possible so we can accommodate as many buses as we are able.

 

·        Northbound I-75/I-71 (from Kentucky, Lexington, Louisville) CARS ONLY, NO BUSES

o   Take the right side exit, Exit 192, 5th Street. Merge on to W 5th Street, continuing for approximately 0.7 miles, turn left on to Greenup Street. After 0.2 miles turn left on to Roebling Way, continuing across the bridge. At the traffic circle, take the 1st exit and continue on to Walnut St. Turn right on to Freedom Way, and make a left at the traffic light (Joe Nuxhall Way/Main St) and turn left to enter the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. The entrance is located half-way up the block (after the restaurant Holy Grail Tavern)

 

·        Northbound I-75/I-71 (from Kentucky, Lexington, Louisville) BUSES or cars

o   As you cross the bridge into Ohio, get into the second lane from the left for Exit 1D, US 50 W. River Road. Once on River Road stay left to immediately take the Gest Street exit. At the end of the ramp turn left on to Gest Street. Continue on to Gest Street for approximately 0.4 miles, making a slight right on to Pete Rose Way. Make an immediate left turn on to Mehring Way. Continue on Mehring Way (east bound).

§  Cars:  Continue on to Mehring way for approximately 1 mile, and turn left in to the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. Parking in the “green” section allows for easiest access to the Freedom Center.

§  Buses:  After approximately 0.7 miles turn left on to Elm St. Turn right at the first traffic light on to Freedom Way Turn right on to Rosa Parks Street and take the second exit on the traffic circle for Walnut Street. Turn left on to Freedom Way and park directly in front of the building. Please pull forward as far as possible so we can accommodate as many buses as we are able.

 

·        Northbound I-471 (from Kentucky, Newport, Bellevue)

o   Take I-471 north. Follow the signs for I-75/US 50 west. The exit is on the right. On Route 50 west (Ft. Washington Way) get into the second lane from the left to follow the signs for I-75 north. Once on I-75 north take the first exit on the right, exit 1G, Liberty St./Ezzard Charles Dr. At end of the exit merge left to turn left at the traffic light, in to the left hand lane on Ezzard Charles Drive. Once on Ezzard Charles Drive turn left at the traffic light on to Western Avenue. Continue in the center lane to turn left at the traffic light. Immediately after the left hand turn you will use the right hand lane to turn on to Freeman Avenue. Continue straight on to Freeman Ave, bearing left on Mehring Way after approximately 0.5 miles. Continue on to Mehring Way (east bound).

§  Cars:  Continue on to Mehring way for approximately 2 miles, and turn left in to the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. Parking in the “green” section allows for easiest access to the Freedom Center.

§  Buses:  After approximately 1.2 miles turn left on to Elm St. Turn right at the first traffic light on to Freedom Way Turn right on to Rosa Parks Street and take the second exit on the traffic circle for Walnut Street. Turn left on to Freedom Way and park directly in front of the building. Please pull forward as far as possible so we can accommodate as many buses as we are able.

 

·        Eastbound on I-74 E (from Indianapolis)

o   Follow I-74 east to I-75 south, toward downtown Cincinnati. Take the right side exit, Exit 1F, Freeman Avenue. Continue straight on to Freeman Ave, bearing left on Mehring Way after approximately 0.5 miles. Continue on to Mehring Way (east bound).

§  Cars:  Continue on to Mehring way for approximately 2 miles, and turn left in to the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. Parking in the “green” section allows for easiest access to the Freedom Center.

§  Buses:  After approximately 1.2 miles turn left on to Elm St. Turn right at the first traffic light on to Freedom Way Turn right on to Rosa Parks Street and take the second exit on the traffic circle for Walnut Street. Turn left on to Freedom Way and park directly in front of the building. Please pull forward as far as possible so we can accommodate as many buses as we are able.

 

·        Eastbound on River Road, Route 50 (from Saylor Park)

o   Take the Freeman Avenue exit. Turn left on to Freeman Avenue. Continue straight on to Freeman Ave, bearing left on Mehring Way after approximately 0.5 miles. Continue on to Mehring Way Mehring Way (east bound).

§  Cars:  Continue on to Mehring way for approximately 2 miles, and turn left in to the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. Parking in the “green” section allows for easiest access to the Freedom Center.

§  Buses:  After approximately 1.2 miles turn left on to Elm St. Turn right at the first traffic light on to Freedom Way Turn right on to Rosa Parks Street and take the second exit on the traffic circle for Walnut Street. Turn left on to Freedom Way and park directly in front of the building. Please pull forward as far as possible so we can accommodate as many buses as we are able.

 

·        Westbound Columbia Parkway, Route 50 (from Mariemont)

o   Follow US 50 west into downtown. When you get near the stadiums on Ft. Washington Way, get into the second lane from the left for the I-75 north exit. Once on I-75 north, take the first exit on the right, Exit 1G, Liberty St./Ezzard Charles Drive. At end of the exit merge left to turn left at the traffic light, in to the left hand lane on Ezzard Charles Drive. Once on Ezzard Charles Drive turn left at the traffic light on to Western Avenue. Continue in the center lane to turn left at the traffic light. Immediately after the left hand turn you will use the right hand lane to turn on to Freeman Avenue. Continue straight on to Freeman Ave, bearing left on Mehring Way after approximately 0.5 miles. Continue on to Mehring Way (east bound).

§  Cars:  Continue on to Mehring way for approximately 2 miles, and turn left in to the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. Parking in the “green” section allows for easiest access to the Freedom Center.

§  Buses:  After approximately 1.2 miles turn left on to Elm St. Turn right at the first traffic light on to Freedom Way Turn right on to Rosa Parks Street and take the second exit on the traffic circle for Walnut Street. Turn left on to Freedom Way and park directly in front of the building. Please pull forward as far as possible so we can accommodate as many buses as we are able.

 

·        From Downtown

o   Take I-75 north to Ezzard Charles Dr., exit 1G. Access is easy from 4th, 6th or 8th Streets. At end of the exit merge left to turn left at the traffic light, in to the left hand lane on Ezzard Charles Drive. Once on Ezzard Charles Drive turn left at the traffic light on to Western Avenue. Continue in the center lane to turn left at the traffic light. Immediately after the left hand turn you will use the right hand lane to turn on to Freeman Avenue. Continue straight on to Freeman Ave, bearing left on Mehring Way after approximately 0.5 miles. Continue on to Mehring Way (east bound).

§  Cars:  Continue on to Mehring way for approximately 2 miles, and turn left in to the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. Parking in the “green” section allows for easiest access to the Freedom Center.

§  Buses:  After approximately 1.2 miles turn left on to Elm St. Turn right at the first traffic light on to Freedom Way Turn right on to Rosa Parks Street and take the second exit on the traffic circle for Walnut Street. Turn left on to Freedom Way and park directly in front of the building. Please pull forward as far as possible so we can accommodate as many buses as we are able.

 

Saturday, September 16, 2017

 

·        Southbound I-75 (from Dayton, Sharonville)

o   Take I-75 south toward downtown Cincinnati. Take the left side exit, Exit 1C, and follow signs for Downtown/Fifth St. Turn right on to Walnut Street

§  Cars: Proceed south on Walnut Street. Turn left on Second Street and turn right to enter the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. The entrance is located on the second half of the block (after Howl at the Moon).

§  Buses: Proceed south on Walnut Street. Turn right on to Freedom Way, and the Freedom Center will be located on your immediate right-hand side, park directly in front of the building. Please pull forward as far as possible so we can accommodate as many buses as we are able.

 

·        Southbound I-71 (from Columbus, Kenwood, Montgomery)

o   Take I-71 south toward downtown Cincinnati. Use the 2nd from the right lane to take US-42/S Reading Rd exit. Keep left at the fork to continue on Exit 2, follow signs for Gilbert Avenue, and merge on to Gilbert Avenue. Gilbert Avenue turns slightly right and becomes E Eighth Street. Turn left on to Sycamore. Turn right on to Third Street, and use the left two lanes to turn left on to Walnut Street.

§  Cars: Proceed south on Walnut Street. Turn left on Second Street and turn right to enter the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. The entrance is located on the second half of the block (after Howl at the Moon).

§  Buses: Proceed south on Walnut Street. Turn right on to Freedom Way, and the Freedom Center will be located on your immediate right-hand side, park directly in front of the building. Please pull forward as far as possible so we can accommodate as many buses as we are able.

 

·        Northbound I-75/I-71 (from Kentucky, Lexington, Louisville) CARS ONLY, NO BUSES

o   Take the right side exit, Exit 192, 5th Street. Merge on to W 5th Street, continuing for approximately 0.7 miles, turn left on to Greenup Street. After 0.2 miles turn left on to Roebling Way, continuing across the bridge. At the traffic circle, take the 1st exit and continue on to Walnut St. Turn right on to Freedom Way, and make a left at the traffic light (Joe Nuxhall Way/Main St) and turn left to enter the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. The entrance is located half-way up the block (after the restaurant Holy Grail Tavern)

 

·        Northbound I-75/I-71 (from Kentucky, Lexington, Louisville) BUSES or cars

o   As you cross the bridge into Ohio, use into the second lane from the right for Exit 1C, Fifth Street. Continue on to W Fifth Street, making a right on to Walnut Street.

§  Cars: Proceed south on Walnut Street. Turn left on Second Street and turn right to enter the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. The entrance is located on the second half of the block (after Howl at the Moon).

§  Buses: Proceed south on Walnut Street. Turn right on to Freedom Way, and the Freedom Center will be located on your immediate right-hand side, park directly in front of the building. Please pull forward as far as possible so we can accommodate as many buses as we are able.

 

·        Northbound I-471 (from Kentucky, Newport, Bellevue)

o   Take I-471 north. Take exit 6B for Sixth Street toward downtown. Continue on to Sixth Street. Turn left on to Walnut Street.

§  Cars: Proceed south on Walnut Street. Turn left on Second Street and turn right to enter the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. The entrance is located on the second half of the block (after Howl at the Moon).

§  Buses: Proceed south on Walnut Street. Turn right on to Freedom Way, and the Freedom Center will be located on your immediate right-hand side, park directly in front of the building. Please pull forward as far as possible so we can accommodate as many buses as we are able.

 

·        Eastbound on I-74 E (from Indianapolis)

o   Follow I-74 east to I-75 south toward downtown Cincinnati. Take the left side exit, Exit 1C, and follow signs for Downtown/Fifth St. Turn right on to Walnut Street

§  Cars: Proceed south on Walnut Street. Turn left on Second Street and turn right to enter the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. The entrance is located on the second half of the block (after Howl at the Moon).

§  Buses: Proceed south on Walnut Street. Turn right on to Freedom Way, and the Freedom Center will be located on your immediate right-hand side, park directly in front of the building. Please pull forward as far as possible so we can accommodate as many buses as we are able.

 

·        Eastbound on River Road, Route 50 (from Saylor Park)

o   Head east on River Road, take the Fifth Street ramp in to downtown, and continue on to Fifth Street. Turn Right on to Walnut Street.

§  Cars: Proceed south on Walnut Street. Turn left on Second Street and turn right to enter the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. The entrance is located on the second half of the block (after Howl at the Moon).

§  Buses: Proceed south on Walnut Street. Turn right on to Freedom Way, and the Freedom Center will be located on your immediate right-hand side, park directly in front of the building. Please pull forward as far as possible so we can accommodate as many buses as we are able.

 

 

·        Westbound Columbia Parkway, Route 50 (from Mariemont)

o   Head west on Columbia Parkway, using the middle two lanes to stay on Columbia Parkway. Take the Sixth Street exit on the right, continue on to Sixth Street. Turn left on to Walnut Street.

§  Cars: Proceed south on Walnut Street. Turn left on Second Street and turn right to enter the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. The entrance is located on the second half of the block (after Howl at the Moon).

§  Buses: Proceed south on Walnut Street. Turn right on to Freedom Way, and the Freedom Center will be located on your immediate right-hand side, park directly in front of the building. Please pull forward as far as possible so we can accommodate as many buses as we are able.

 

·        From Downtown

o   Head south on Walnut Street.

§  Cars: Proceed south on Walnut Street. Turn left on Second Street and turn right to enter the Central Riverfront Parking Garage. The entrance is located on the second half of the block (after Howl at the Moon).

§  Buses: Proceed south on Walnut Street. Turn right on to Freedom Way, and the Freedom Center will be located on your immediate right-hand side, park directly in front of the building. Please pull forward as far as possible so we can accommodate as many buses as we are able. 

Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 5:00pm

Summer Sundays - Final Weeks

 

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center is the perfect destination for families or individuals to go for a day out while exploring The Banks, or after taking in a church service. With only two Sundays left in our seasonal summer hours, we invite you to visit the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center to be inspired by stories of courage, cooperation and perseverance.

As our Summer Sundays come to a close guests are encouraged to take part in the special experiences we have to offer - The Rosa Parks Experience and the “Open Your Mind” Understanding Implicit Bias Learning Lab. The Rosa Parks Experience is an immersive virtual reality experience that commemorates Civil Rights icon Rosa Parks’ historic demonstration in 1955 – only days before the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Open Your Mind: Understanding Implicit Bias Learning Lab is designed to help the public understand and recognize bias and other forms of discrimination.

 

 

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center’s summer hours continue until Sunday, September 3, 2017 from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm. The museum will also be open to the public on Labor Day from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

 

Kelsey Fay

Group Sales Coordinator

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

Friday, August 11, 2017 - 1:24pm

Vote For Us As Your Top Ohio Attraction on 10Best.com

 

Hopefully by now you’ve had the opportunity to visit us over the summer to see our powerful exhibitions such as Mandela: The Journey to Ubuntu; try the virtual reality simulation, the Rosa Parks Experience and test your biases in our Understanding Implicit Bias Learning Lab. We are proud to bring these thought-provoking exhibits as we continue to inspire and challenge our guests to take courageous steps of freedom today. That said, we work immensely to bring you these experiences and USA Today’s 10Best.com has taken notice.

Part of the USA Today brand, 10Best gives users original, unbiased and experiential insight on travel and top destinations throughout the country as well as the world. The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center has been nominated as one of Ohio’s favorite attractions and we’re getting the word out to our supporters everywhere. Log onto the link provided below to cast your vote once a day until Monday, August 28 at noon. The top 10 winning attractions will be announced on Friday, September 1. We thank you in advance for not only allowing us to be a part of your museum experience, but also letting us be an attraction you visit for your 2017 summer season. #MyNURFC

 Link to vote: http://bit.ly/2vmGrr7

 

Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 12:49pm

Why Knowing the Red Flag Indicators of Human Trafficking Is Important

Modern-day slavery does not care who you are, what you look like, or where you come from. It can happen to anyone—any of us—at any given time.

It is estimated that 20-45.8 million people are enslaved in the world today, in every country in the world today, including the United States. Although exact numbers are difficult to pin point, in the U.S. we know that in the past eight years more than 31,600 total cases of human trafficking have been reported to the National Human Trafficking Hotline[1].

But what is human trafficking? Is it the same as modern day slavery? In short, yes. The United Nations defines human trafficking as, “the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harboring, or receipt of persons by improper means (such as force, abduction, fraud, or coercion) for an improper purpose including forced labor or sexual exploitation.” [2] Both the definition of “modern day slavery” and “human trafficking” deal with the enslavement of human beings.

As previously stated—slavery can happen to anyone. Not all enslaved people look one specific way, nor do all traffickers look one specific way. However, there are red flag indicators in human trafficking cases that help people correctly identify victims.  And knowing these indicators do help. In 2016, the National Human Trafficking Hotline found that community members called the hotline more than any other demographic. Out of 26,727 calls made last year, 7,545 of them were placed by members in the community who knew the signs.

So, why am I telling you all of this? On June 10th, the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center held See & Say: How to Spot the Signs of Human Trafficking, a training workshop aimed at helping people understand the red flag indicators of human trafficking. We wanted to provide the general public with an introductory training of these warning sings, with the ultimate goal if you see something, you will say something. The idea for the program came after a discussion with the Freedom Center’s curator, Dr. Ashley Jordan, about how a person could receive training on the warning signs of human trafficking. This conversation stemmed from the news report on Shelia Fedrick, the Alaskan Airlines flight attendant who was successfully able to identify a victim of human trafficking on her flight last February[3]. Because of Shelia Fedrick’s knowledge of these critical signs, she was able to help a young girl escape enslavement.

Understanding the signs of human trafficking is one of the easiest ways a person can help fight against slavery—it literally just requires you to be more vigilant and aware in your normal, everyday situations. At the Freedom Center, part of our mission is to “challenge and inspire everyone to take courageous steps of freedom today,” and that is what our See & Say program was all about. Our goal was to educate attendees on the warning signs of human trafficking and encourage “if you see something, say something.[4]” 

Katie Bramell

Researcher

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center


[1] https://polarisproject.org/facts

[2] http://www.endslaverynow.org/learn/slavery-today

[3] http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/flight-attendants-train-spot-human-trafficking-n716181

[4] http://www.endslaverynow.org/act/action-library/read-and-share-these-red-flag-indicators

 

Thursday, July 6, 2017 - 3:56pm

The Idea Behind the Forgive/Fight Initiative

 

On July 18, 2017 at 2:11 pm, twenty-seven FORGIVE/FIGHT statements will be read aloud by the eternal flame on our third floor balcony. These statements have been collected over the course of the run of Mandela: The Journey to Ubuntu. This is NURFC’s world premiere temporary exhibition showcasing the life of former South African President Nelson Mandela from his early childhood through his fight against apartheid, onto his presidency and beyond.

These statements have been collected from visitors as they exit the exhibit. Each of our visitors have been encouraged after viewing the exhibition to reflect on what they are willing to forgive in their life and what they are willing to fight for. The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center has had an overwhelming rate of participation in this exercise and we wanted a way to showcase the impact that Nelson Mandela’s life and actions have had on the Cincinnati community.  The idea of reading these important and poignant statements from the hearts of our visitors came from a program at another museum, the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum in Chicago.  The Hull-House Museum performed a mock election last fall for members of their community that were unable to vote in the national election due to legal status, age, past criminal history, etc.  The museum gave voice to their community on important issues that affected them where they otherwise would have had none.  Visitors were encouraged to take a statement left on these “ballots” and read them aloud on a bullhorn from a second story window out into the street.

The NURFC recognized very quickly after the opening of Mandela: The Journey to Ubuntu that our own community had very powerful things to say about a range of issues affecting them and our world. We invite you to join us on July 18th , what would have been President Mandela’s ninety-ninth birthday as we borrow the Hull-House Museum’s concept  and we read aloud these statements of forgiveness and resistance. In the spirit of Mandela’s legacy we will read one statement for each of the twenty-seven years Mandela was held in bondage by the fascist government policies of Apartheid.

We sincerely hope you will join us on the afternoon of July 18 as we honor the legacy of Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela. His courageous actions changed the world. Listen with us as we hear the impact of his work on our visitors and learn what Cincinnatians want to forgive and what we as a community are ready to fight for.

 

 Jesse Kramer

Creative Director

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 2:31pm

We are Open Tuesday, July 4

As we approach mid-summer with the holiday upon us, you may be looking for ways to entertain family and guests coming to town. We’d like to suggest that you make a trip to the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center as we’ll be open Tuesday, July 4 from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

“The journey to freedom has no days off and neither should this great institution as we are thrilled to be open on the Fourth of July,” says Interim Executive Director Dan Hurley. “We are committed to ensuring we are available to as many people as possible so that they have the opportunity to learn about freedom’s heroes – past and present, anytime of the year.”

The Fourth of July holiday hours will provide the public with opportunities to tour permanent exhibitions and experience special exhibitions, including Mandela: The Journey to Ubuntu. This powerful exhibition, open now through August 20, commemorates the life and legacy of former South African President Nelson Mandela through photographs by Matthew Willman as he revisited many of the locations that had played an important role in South Africa’s route to racial equality and Mandela’s personal fight for freedom. The Mandela: The Journey to Ubuntu presenting sponsors are John and Francie Pepper, Macy’s, and The John A. Schroth Family Charitable Trust, PNC Bank, Trustee. Supporting sponsors include ArtsWave and Cincinnati Bell. Community partners include Northern Kentucky University’s Public History Department and Gleason Builders.

Guests can also visit recent museum additions including –The Rosa Parks Experience and the “Open Your Mind” Understanding Implicit Bias Learning LabThe Rosa Parks Experience sponsored by Procter & Gamble is an immersive virtual reality experience that commemorates Civil Rights icon Rosa Parks’ historic demonstration in 1955 – only days before the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Open Your Mind: Understanding Implicit Bias Learning Lab is designed to help the public understand and recognize bias and other forms of discrimination. The learning lab is sponsored by The Coca-Cola Foundation and Procter & Gamble.

Hours on July 4 at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center are from 11:00 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information about exhibits and programs at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, visit freedomcenter.org.

 

Will Jones

Public Relations & Social Media Coordinator

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

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Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 1:15pm

2017 Summer Hours Begin Sunday

“Whether it’s after a church service or community fellowship, or an afternoon in the park with your family enjoying The Banks community - our doors are open for all to experience the museum and be inspired by stories of courage, cooperation and perseverance.” Richard Cooper

As Mondays in May come to close on Memorial Day, our seasonal summer hours are just around the corner. Starting on Sunday May 28, the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center will be open on Sundays from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. for guests to enjoy on through Labor Day. Additional summer hours will provide the public with opportunities to engage in historical programming, tour permanent exhibitions and experience special exhibitions, including Mandela: The Journey to Ubuntu. This powerful exhibition, open now through August 20, commemorates the life, journey and legacy of South African President Nelson Mandela through images from documentary photographer Matthew Willman. Commissioned by the Nelson Mandela Foundation, Willman spent the final 10 years of Mandela’s life capturing intimate moments and rare stories about his personal fight for freedom and South Africa’s road to racial equality.  

Guests can also visit recent museum additions – The Rosa Parks Experience and the “Open Your Mind” Understanding Implicit Bias Learning Lab. The Rosa Parks Experience is an immersive virtual reality experience that commemorates Civil Rights icon Rosa Parks’ historic demonstration in 1955 – only days before the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Open Your Mind: Understanding Implicit Bias Learning Lab is designed to help the public understand and recognize bias and other forms of discrimination.

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center’s summer hours begin this Sunday, May 28, from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., through Labor Day weekend. The museum will also be open to the public on Memorial Day from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

Will Jones
Public Relations & Social Media Coordinator
National Underground Railroad Freedom Center 

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Tuesday, November 15, 2016 - 3:53pm

Give the Gift of Freedom: Buy One Membership, Get One for Half Price

 

‘Tis the season of giving. Why not give your family and friends the gift of a National Underground Railroad Freedom Center membership?

From November 18 through January 1, you can get one membership for half price with the purchase of a membership of equal or greater value. Give yourself the gift of membership, and share that gift for half price!

Freedom Center Members enjoy a full year of benefits, including free admission to the permanent exhibits, discounts on additional tickets, discounts at the Cincinnati Museum Center, members-only events and a members-only e-newsletter.

For example, in December, Freedom Center members will have the opportunity to take part in the Rosa Parks Experience, including a discussion on the impact one person’s acts can have in the fight for freedom.  This type of experience is just part of what membership can mean.

Imagine the chance to visit and re-visit the Freedom Center without paying the admission price each time.  Imagine studying freedom and the fight for freedom through our wide-ranging interactive exhibits without worry of running out of time. 

In the coming year, the Freedom Center will open its Implicit Bias Learning Lab, as well as launch an exhibit on Nelson Mandela … and members will be in the front row with newsletter updates as well as a chance for an insider’s view of all the Freedom Center initiatives.

Purchase or renew your membership today, and you can also purchase an equal or lesser value membership as a gift for the special people in your life.  Imagine giving a family a full year of insider access to the Freedom Center for only $32.50! 

Memberships are available for as little as $35 for a senior individual membership (that’s only $17.50 with the purchase of your membership!).  Family memberships are only $65 -- $32.50 if you take advantage of this limited time offer.  (Please note, Partner level memberships cannot be discounted.)

Give the gift that lasts a full year.  Give the gift of inspiration, education, and enlightenment.  Give the gift of a Freedom Center membership this holiday season!

Thursday, November 3, 2016 - 12:00am

Go Vote, America

 

In just a few short days Americans will wake up with a civic obligation to go to the polls and cast their vote. In the absence of some catastrophic event there are two inevitabilities and two choices facing us on November 8th and beyond. The two inevitabilities are; first there will be an election on November 8th and second there will be a 45th President of these United States.

The two choices facing us are: first, the candidates who do not win will have to choose both to concede and congratulate the winner or to refuse to concede and congratulate the President Elect, whoever that may be.  The second choice each of us must make is how we answer the fundamental question “where do we go beyond this highly contentious election?”

We may disagree but our disagreements must not go beyond the pale of civility and our arguments must be about opposing views with reason and logic as the chief instruments of argumentation. Civility requires that personal, degrading and disrespecting attacks are out of bound. We can choose to sink to the abyss of chaos and become the divided people of America or we can choose to ascend to the heights of community building as the united people of America and become what the founders of this nation described as a city set on a hill shinning the light of freedom, liberty, justice, opportunity, growth, development, hope, aspiration, inclusiveness and progress.

We can choose to minimize our diversity by limiting power, position and privilege to out dated demographics, or we can choose to embrace the vast diversity of our nation and empower all people to enjoy equal opportunity to fulfill their potential without regard to their race, religion, gender, preference, or political affiliation. 

When we make the choice to move toward constructive community building we are making the choice to embrace the richness of diversity. It is a movement toward openness. It is a movement toward breaking down barriers. It is a movement toward bridge building. It is a movement toward the brotherhood and sisterhood of humanity. Wither we are Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, agnostic, or atheist we are all existentially and ontologically connected.

We have the means, skills and technology to eliminate hunger, poverty and disparity. We have the capacity to build communities that are diverse, integrated and equitable, we must now embrace the moral courage and the political will to do so.

So, in a few days we will elect a President and Vice President, a senate, a congress, governors, state legislators, and municipal leaders. After the election you and I must decide if we will work together to build a constructive, compassionate community or if we will allow our great nation to slip into chaos. I implore us to join together and choose to build community. The future of our great democracy is in our hands not only in terms of how we vote but also in terms of what we do after the election.

Amb. Michael A. Battle, DMin, executive vice president & provost

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